Andrew Griesmer | July 17, 2014

Professional baseball pitchers are able to make a baseball move left, right, down, and even up (sort of) to get it by the opposing batter. The physics behind this can be explained by the Magnus effect.

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Laura Bowen | July 16, 2014

The need for a contaminant-free space to manufacture medicine has led scientists to try many creative new approaches to improve the process. At Argonne National Lab, creating a device that floats and rotates chemical compounds in thin air was just the answer they were looking for. It meant two important changes: the amount of each chemical necessary could be implemented very precisely and the risk of outside impurities disrupting the results was minimized.

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Alexandra Foley | June 25, 2014

Wind turbine noise is a (hotly disputed) topic that we’ve mentioned on the blog before. While research into noise production by wind farms is still being debated among researchers, one way we’ve found to overcome these noisy turbine troubles is to place turbines offshore where they can’t be heard and, conveniently, high winds with more regularity make energy production more effective. However, a question that comes to mind is: What impact do offshore wind farms have on marine life?

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Fabian Scheuren | June 23, 2014

One of the main issues with high-power electrical devices is thermal management. Together with BLOCK Transformatoren, we created a model using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software that encompasses all of the important details when modeling heating of high-power electrical devices. To do so, we had to utilize high performance computing (HPC) with hybrid modeling. Here, we will discuss how to approach this real-life task with the COMSOL software.

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Ed Fontes | June 12, 2014

The Beckham and Maradona curl obtained with the inside of the soccer cleat (football boot), and the curl by Eder, Nelinho, and Roberto Carlos with the outside of the cleat, is due to the Magnus effect. The effect is named after the scientist who first observed it in a laboratory in the 1850s. The Magnus effect explains the side-force on a sphere that is both rotating and moving forward. Here, we use it to analyze the World Cup™ match ball.

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Clemens Ruhl | April 21, 2014

The Wall Distance interface is used to calculate the distance to a wall in the turbulent flow interfaces available in COMSOL Multiphysics. It can be combined with any other interface and comes in handy when we need to calculate the distance to the nearest wall or detect, as part of a dynamic model, when a moving object will hit a wall. Today, we will study how the Wall Distance interface works and how other interfaces can benefit from its capabilities.

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Nancy Bannach | April 7, 2014

Fluid flow is involved in many engineering applications. In addition to typical CFD simulations, which replace experiments in wind tunnels, flow must also be considered in the cooling of electronic devices or in the chemical industry, where reacting species are transported by a fluid. COMSOL Multiphysics offers dedicated interfaces for various flow types. When should we use the Laminar Flow or Turbulent Flow interface?

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Valerio Marra | March 18, 2014

What do heated soap bubbles, wavy clouds, and Jupiter’s Great Red Spot have in common? Their formation depends on the dynamics of the shear layer existing between two parallel streams moving at different velocities. This unstable motion, called Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, is ubiquitous and plays an important role in the dynamics of climate, for example. Let’s take a closer look at the onset and evolution of this instability with the help of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis.

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Ahsan Munir | February 26, 2014

DNA is a complex molecule that contains instructions for life and often referred to as a “digital fingerprint” or code telling a cell what to do. DNA is often the only means for accurate testing and identification of biomolecules, cells, or even an entire person during forensic investigations. The need to be able to test for DNA, as quickly as possible, and even at the site where the sample is taken, is becoming more and more important.

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Andrew Griesmer | February 25, 2014

A circulating fluidized bed (CFB) is used to create a homogeneous mixture of gas (usually air) and solid particles to increase the efficiency of the combustion process in boilers. A better understanding of this process will help engineers to optimize their design parameters based on their individual needs. The Circulating Fluidized Bed model in COMSOL does just this, simulating a CFB with a given set of parameters that are easily interchangeable, depending on the needs of the user.

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Alexandra Foley | January 27, 2014

There are, in general, two different types of ventilation systems: mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation. Displacement ventilation is used in large spaces with tall ceilings (at least three meters high), and therefore is mainly found in office buildings, schools, and other public spaces. These higher ceilings allow for upward convective flows exhausting air contaminants, thus resulting in improved air quality. This post explores the simulation of a displacement ventilation system to determine the air temperature and velocity within a room.

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